Expected Life

 

Americans often believe that the life expectancy of our citizens is higher than anywhere else in the world. They believe that we have the best health care and access to nutritious foods, and we are, after all, the greatest country on earth. In 1970 this was, for the most part, entirely true. Unfortunately, this is not a true fact anymore. A report out from the OECD shows that the United States average lifespan has fallen one year behind the international average. In fact, we are lower than Canada and Germany. However, life expectancy has not gone down since 1970, but rather it has increased by eight years. But it is growing a lot more slowly than other countries.

So what is the actual life expectancy of a United States citizen?  According to MedScape, between 2013 and 2014, overall life expectancy at birth for the total US population held steady at 78.8 years, according to the latest data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).For men, life expectancy was 76.4 years, and for women, it was 81.2 years, Elizabeth Arias, Ph.D., from the NCHS, Division of Vital Statistics, notes in a new NCHA data brief, published online April 20.

According to data compiled by the Social Security Administration:

  • A man reaching age 65 today can expect to live, on average, until age 84.3.
  • A woman turning age 65 today can expect to live, on average, until age 86.6.

And those are just averages. About one out of every four 65-year-olds today will live past age 90, and one out of 10 will live past age 95. Do you want to know your life expectancy? Click below to find out.

Life Expectancy Calculator

So while we do live in a great country and our resources are plentiful, we all know that our habits contribute greatly to how long we remain. I am now getting up from this computer and going for a long walk. I want to be a part of the team of people that brings our expected average above the rest, instead of lagging behind.

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